‘F--k the pope’ woman on medication

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A 48-year-old woman who said ‘f—k the Pope and Muslims’ during a drunken episode was given 120 hours community service last Thursday at Banbridge Magistrates Court.

At a previous court Michaela Mitchell, Chinauley Park, Banbridge, admitted charges of disorderly behaviour and assaulting a constable at Castlewellan Road, Banbridge, on June 19 this year.

The court heard that at around 10pm a taxi driver stopped at the gates of Banbridge police station, saying a passenger was refusing to get out. Mitchell, who was in the front seat and clearly intoxicated, was aggressive right from the outset and continued with a foul mouthed diatribe.

A police officer had to remove her from the taxi and she continued to shout against the IRA and the Pope and make certain comments including ‘f—k the Pope and Muslims’.

She was handcuffed and on the way to Lurgan custody suite she attempted to head-butt a constable. In custody she lashed out and kicked a constable in the testicles.

Mitchell continued to be abusive and was put in limb restraints.

A solicitor representing the defendant said she didn’t recall anything about the incident. She explained that her client had gone into a pub for a couple of drinks and this reacted with her medication which caused her to ‘black out’.

The solicitor said this was totally out of character for Mitchell, who had a clear record, and she was completely embarrassed at what had happened.

She added that her client had no issues with any member of the community and was very remorseful.

The solicitor asked the judge to consider community service or a conditional discharge for someone whose first offence was at the age of 48.

Deputy District Judge Philip Mateer told the defendant her behaviour was ‘extremely reprehensible’ and the pre-sentence report indicated her problems.

But, he added, this was ‘outrageous behaviour’ and not only was there serious abuse but she had kicked a police officer causing him maximum discomfort.